Diabetes, Its Types And Symptoms Of Diabetes, Prevention Of Diabetes .

Diabetes mellitus, commonly known simply as diabetes, is a metabolic disease that results in high blood sugar levels.

The hormone insulin carries sugar from the blood into cells, where it is stored or used for energy. With diabetes, your body doesn’t make enough insulin or can’t use the insulin it makes effectively.

Diabetes Exercises TO control

High blood sugar from untreated diabetes can damage your nerves, eyes, kidneys, and other organs. But learning about diabetes and taking steps to prevent or treat it can help protect your health.

Table Of Contents

There is no cure for diabetes yet, but losing weight, eating healthy, and exercising can really help. Other things you can do to help:

  • Take the medication as prescribed.
  • Get diabetes self-management training and support.
  • Schedule and keep medical appointments.

Types Of Diabetes .

There Are Mainly 2 Types Of Diabetes Found : Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes, Gestational Diabetes And Diabetes While Pregnancy .

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is thought to be caused by an autoimmune reaction (the body accidentally attacks itself). This reaction prevents your body from making insulin. About 5 to 10% of people with diabetes have type 1 diabetes.

Symptoms of type 1 diabetes often develop quickly. It is usually diagnosed in children, adolescents, and young adults. If you have type 1 diabetes, you need to inject insulin every day to survive. Currently, no one knows how to prevent type 1 diabetes.

Type 2 Diabetes

With type 2 diabetes, your body doesn’t use insulin well and can’t keep your blood sugar at normal levels. About 90-95% of people with diabetes have type 2.

It develops over many years and is usually diagnosed in adults (but increasingly in children, adolescents, and young adults). You may not notice any symptoms, so it’s important to test your blood sugar if you’re at risk.

Type 2 diabetes can be prevented or delayed through healthy lifestyle choices, such as:

  • Lose weight.
  • Eat healthy food
  • be active

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes occurs in pregnant women who have never had diabetes. If you have gestational diabetes, your baby may be at higher risk for health problems. Gestational diabetes usually goes away after your baby is born.

However, it increases the risk of type 2 diabetes later in life. Your baby is more likely to be obese as a child or adolescent and to develop type 2 diabetes later in life.

Symptoms Of Diabetes Mellitus

Basic Symptoms Of Diabetes Are :

  • Increase Hunger
  • Frequently Urination
  • Blurry Vision
  • Sores That Do Not Heal
  • Weight Loss Without Trying
  • Extreme Fatigue
  • Dry Skin
  • Have More Infection Than Usual
  • Are Very Thirsty
Diabetes Types And Symptoms

Prevention Of Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes cannot be prevented. But choosing healthy lifestyles that help control prediabetes, type 2 diabetes, and gestational diabetes can also help prevent them:

Eat healthy food– Choose foods with less fat and calories and more fiber. Focus on fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. Eat a variety of foods so you don’t get bored.

Do more physical activity – Try to get about 30 minutes of moderate aerobic activity most days of the week. Or aim for at least 150 minutes of moderate aerobic activity per week. For example, take a brisk walk every day. If you can’t afford a long workout, break it up into smaller chunks throughout the day.

Lose the extra kilos – If you are overweight, losing as little as 7% of your body weight can reduce your risk of diabetes. For example, if you weigh 200 pounds (90.7 kilograms), losing 14 pounds (6.4 kilograms) can lower your risk of diabetes.

But don’t try to lose weight during pregnancy. Talk to your provider about how much weight you can gain during pregnancy.

To keep your weight in a healthy range, work on making long-term changes to your eating habits and physical activity. Think about the benefits of losing weight, like a healthier heart, more energy, and higher self-esteem.

Sometimes medication is an option. Oral diabetes medications such as metformin (Glumetza, Fortamet, others) can reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes. But a healthy lifestyle is important.

If you have prediabetes, check your blood sugar level at least once a year to make sure you haven’t developed type 2 diabetes.

Treatment Of Diabetes

Treatment for type 1 diabetes includes insulin injections or use of an insulin pump, frequent blood sugar checks, and carbohydrate counting. For some people with type 1 diabetes, a pancreas transplant or islet cell transplant may be an option.

Treatment for type 2 diabetes primarily involves lifestyle changes, blood sugar control, and oral diabetes medications, insulin, or both.

Monitoring Blood Sugar Level Regularly

Depending on your treatment plan, you may measure and record your blood glucose level up to four times a day or more often if you use insulin. Only careful monitoring can ensure that your blood sugar level stays within your target range. People with type 2 diabetes who don’t take insulin usually check their blood sugar levels much less often.

People on insulin therapy may also choose to monitor their blood sugar level using a continuous blood glucose monitor. Although this technology has yet to fully replace the blood glucose meter, it can reduce the number of fingerprints required to measure blood glucose and provide important information about trends in blood glucose levels.

Even with careful management, blood sugar levels can sometimes change unpredictably. With the help of your diabetes care team, you can learn how your blood sugar levels change in response to food, physical activity, medicine, illness, alcohol, and stress. For women, learn how your blood sugar level changes in response to changes in hormone levels.

In addition to daily blood sugar monitoring, your provider will likely recommend regular A1C tests to measure your average blood sugar level over the past 2 to 3 months.

Compared to repeat daily blood glucose tests, the A1C test provides a better indication of the overall effectiveness of your diabetes treatment plan. A higher A1C reading may indicate the need to change your oral medications, insulin regimen, or diet.

Your A1C goal can vary based on your age and several other factors, such as: B. other medical conditions you may have or your ability to detect when your blood sugar is low. However, for most people with diabetes, the American Diabetes Association recommends an A1C of less than 7%. Ask your provider about your A1C goal.

Diabetes Regular Blood Sugar Test

Insulin

People with type 1 diabetes need insulin therapy to survive. Many people with type 2 diabetes or gestational diabetes also need insulin therapy.

There are many types of insulin available, including short-acting insulin (regular insulin), rapid-acting insulin, long-acting insulin, and options in between. Depending on your needs, your doctor may prescribe a mixture of different types of insulin to use day and night.

Insulin cannot be taken by mouth to lower blood sugar because stomach enzymes interfere with the action of insulin. Insulin is often injected with a fine needle and syringe, or with an insulin pen, a device that looks like a large ink pen.

An insulin pump may also be an option. The pump is a device about the size of a small cell phone that is worn outside the body. A tube connects the insulin reservoir to a tube (catheter) that is inserted under the skin of your abdomen.

A continuous blood glucose monitor (left) is a device that uses a sensor inserted under the skin to measure blood sugar every few minutes. A pocket insulin pump is a device worn outside the body with a tube that connects the insulin reservoir to a catheter inserted under the skin of the abdomen. Insulin pumps are programmed to deliver specific amounts of insulin continuously and with food.

A tubeless pump that works wirelessly is also available. You program an insulin pump to deliver specific amounts of insulin. It can be adjusted to deliver more or less insulin based on meals, activity level, and blood sugar level.

The Food and Drug Administration has approved four artificial pancreases for type 1 diabetes.

An artificial pancreas is also known as closed-loop insulin delivery. The implanted device connects a continuous blood glucose monitor, which checks blood sugar every five minutes, to an insulin pump. The device automatically delivers the correct amount of insulin when prompted by the monitor.

Other artificial (closed circuit) pancreas systems are currently in clinical trials.

Oral And Other Drugs

Sometimes your provider may also prescribe other oral or injected medications. Some diabetes medications help the pancreas release more insulin. Others stop your liver from making and releasing glucose, which means you need less insulin to get sugar into your cells.

Others block the action of stomach or intestinal enzymes that break down carbohydrates, slowing their absorption or making tissues more sensitive to insulin. Metformin (Glumetza, Fortamet, others) is often the first drug prescribed for type 2 diabetes.

Another class of drugs called SGLT2 inhibitors may be used. They work by preventing the kidneys from reabsorbing filtered sugar back into the blood. Instead, the sugar is excreted in the urine.

Transplantation

For some people with type 1 diabetes, a pancreas transplant may be an option. Islet transplants are also being studied. With a successful pancreas transplant, you no longer need insulin therapy.

But transplants are not always successful. And these procedures carry serious risks. They need lifelong immunosuppressive drugs to prevent organ rejection. These medications can have serious side effects. For this reason, transplants are usually reserved for people whose diabetes cannot be controlled or who also need a kidney transplant.

Treatment Of Gestation Diabetes

Controlling your blood sugar level is important to keep your baby healthy. It can also save you from complications during childbirth. In addition to a healthy diet and regular exercise, your treatment plan may include monitoring your blood sugar level. In some cases, you may also use insulin or oral medications.

Your provider will monitor your blood sugar level during labor. When your blood sugar level rises, your baby can release high levels of insulin. This can cause hypoglycemia immediately after birth.

Treatment Of Prediabetes

If you have prediabetes, adopting a healthy lifestyle can help bring your blood sugar levels back to normal. Or it could keep you from reaching the levels seen in type 2 diabetes. Maintaining a healthy weight through exercise and a healthy diet can help. Exercising at least 150 minutes a week and losing about 7% of your body weight can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes.

Medications such as metformin, statins, and blood pressure medications may be an option for some people with prediabetes and other conditions, such as heart disease.

Frequently Ask Questions

Question 1 – What Is Diabetes ?

Answer – Diabetes mellitus, commonly known simply as diabetes, is a metabolic disease that results in high blood sugar levels. The hormone insulin carries sugar from the blood into cells, where it is stored or used for energy. With diabetes, your body doesn’t make enough insulin or can’t use the insulin it makes effectively.

Question 2 – What Is The Symptoms Of Diabetes ?

Answer – Symptoms Of Diabetes Includes Increase Hunger , Frequently Urination , Blurry Vision , Sores That Do Not Heal , Weight Loss Without Trying , Extreme Fatigue , Dry Skin , Have More Infection Than Usual, The Person Feels Very Thirsty.

Question 3 – What Are The Types Of Diabetes ?

Answer – There Are Mainly 2 Types Of Diabetes Found : Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes, Gestational Diabetes And Diabetes While Pregnancy .

Question 4 – What Is Type 1 Diabetes ? And Its Symptoms ?

Answer – Type 1 diabetes is thought to be caused by an autoimmune reaction (the body accidentally attacks itself). This reaction prevents your body from making insulin. About 5 to 10% of people with diabetes have type 1 diabetes.

Symptoms of type 1 diabetes often develop quickly. It is usually diagnosed in children, adolescents, and young adults. If you have type 1 diabetes, you need to inject insulin every day to survive. Currently, no one knows how to prevent type 1 diabetes.

Question 5 – What Is Type 2 Diabetes ? And Its Symptoms ?

Answer – With type 2 diabetes, your body doesn’t use insulin well and can’t keep your blood sugar at normal levels. About 90-95% of people with diabetes have type 2. It develops over many years and is usually diagnosed in adults (but increasingly in children, adolescents, and young adults). You may not notice any symptoms, so it’s important to test your blood.

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